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Supporting Open Science in The Netherlands

noad-the-netherlands

The Netherlands is considered a front-runner in Open Science and has indeed been very progressive in promoting and facilitating Open Science.

The OpenAIRE network provides opportunities to learn from each other and coordinates efforts in making the transition to Open Science happen.

Loek Brinkman

The OpenAIRE team has the pleasure of speaking to Loek Brinkman, Research Data Specialist at DANS-KNAW and OpenAIRE NOAD for The Netherlands. Read his reflections on Open Science

How does DANS support Open Science in the Netherlands?

Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS) is the leading data repository and centre of expertise for research data in the Netherlands. With almost 250.000 datasets and 60 people on staff, we provide the infrastructure and support to store, preserve and access research data according to the FAIR principles and over time. DANS is one of the key players shaping the national agenda for Open Science (Open Science NL) and is coordinating one of the three national Thematic Digital Competence Centres (for the research area of Social Science and Humanities). At the European level, DANS is coordinating the FAIR-IMPACT project and is participating in several other projects that promote FAIR data and Open Science.

When and why did you decide to join OpenAIRE and become a NOAD?

DANS has been hosting the NOAD in the Netherlands for quite some time, a position that was held by my (former) colleague Elly Dijk. With Elly's retirement, I got invited to take up her position as NOAD. The mission and ambition of OpenAIRE align well with that of DANS, as well as with my personal perspective on how to promote the uptake of Open Science practices. Hence, I was very happy to accept this invitation!

What do you think is missing in The Netherlands to fully embrace Open Science? 

The Netherlands is considered a front-runner in Open Science and has indeed been very progressive in promoting and facilitating Open Science. The main challenge is using this momentum to reach the research community by and large and scale up the adoption of Open Science practices amongst researchers, to make it common practice. This requires fostering engagement within research communities and connecting those communities to providers of research infrastructure and services. This does not happen by itself and requires dedicated and skilled community managers to fulfil this role. Acknowledging the importance of and investing in community managers is key for the next phase in the transition to Open Science.

What are the top three priorities you will focus on next year?

How do you think OpenAIRE will help you succeed?

Open Science is science without borders. Therefore, for the transition to Open Science to take shape, we need to act locally while coordinating at a global level. The OpenAIRE network provides opportunities to learn from each other and coordinates efforts in making the transition to Open Science happen, e.g. by providing excellent services to the research community. We need initiatives like OpenAIRE and I'm glad to be part of it!

Get in touch with our NOAD in The Netherlands!

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Loek Brinkman

European Open Science Infrastructure, for open scholarly communication
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