EC announces Open Science Cloud and open research data by default

The "European Cloud Initiative – Building a competitive data and knowledge economy in Europe" aims to strengthen Europe's position in data-driven innovation, improve its competitiveness and cohesion, and help create a Digital Single Market in Europe. Towards this the EC will make Open Data the default for funded projects by 2017.

On April 19th the European Commission presented its blueprint for cloud-based services and world-class data infrastructure. The planned European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) aims to create a trusted environment for hosting and processing research data to support EU science in its global leading role. It will give Europe's 1.7 million researchers and 70 million science and technology professionals a virtual environment to store, share and re-use their data across disciplines and borders. It will provide a secure environment where privacy and data protection must be guaranteed by design, based on recognised standards, and where users can be confident concerning data security and liability risks.

To develop the EOSC and take the lead in data-sharing the Commission will make all scientific data produced by Horizon 2020-funded projects open by default by 2017. This will extend the current pilot, whereby projects implement data management plans to make it easier to find, access and re-use research data. However, existing opt-out facilities will be preserved, to take into account for example the sensitiveness of certain data from domains such as security or data that are very close to market.

Introduced at the start of 2015, covering just seven work programme areas, the Horizon 2020 Open Research Data Pilot has been a big success. In the first six months of the pilot, about a third of projects (65.4%, 431 signed grant agreements) that were part of the pilot chose to opt out. The most common reasons for opting out were: (1) concerns over intellectual property (37%), (2) the project did not expect to generate any data (18%), and privacy/data protection concerns (18%). Of those projects that were not originally part of the pilot, 11.9% (3268 projects) nonetheless have voluntarily opted in. For further details, click here

Data Pilot Opt out Reasons

The "European Cloud Initiative – Building a competitive data and knowledge economy in Europe" aims to strengthen Europe's position in data-driven innovation, improve its competitiveness and cohesion, and help create aDigital Single Marketin Europe. Towards this the EC will make Open Data the default for funded projects by 2017.

On April 19th the European Commission presented its blueprint for cloud-based services and world-class data infrastructure. The planned European Open Science Cloud(EOSC) aims to create a trusted environment for hosting and processing research data to support EU science in its global leading role. It will give Europe's 1.7 million researchers and 70 million science and technology professionals a virtual environment to store, share and re-use their data across disciplines and borders. It will provide a secure environment where privacy and data protection must be guaranteed by design, based on recognised standards, and where users can be confident concerning data security and liability risks.

To develop the EOSC and take the lead in data-sharing the Commission will make all scientificdata produced by Horizon 2020-funded projects open by defaultby 2017. This willextend thecurrent pilot, whereby projects implement data management plans to make it easier to find, access and re-use research data. However, existingopt-out facilities will be preserved, to take into account for example the sensitiveness of certain data from domains such as security or data that are very close to market.
 

Introduced at the start of 2015, covering just seven work programme areas, the Horizon 2020 Open Research Data Pilot has been a big success. In the first six months of the pilot, about a third of projects (65.4%, 431 signed grant agreements) that were part of the pilot chose to opt out. The most common reasons for opting out were: (1) concerns over intellectual property (37%), (2) the project did not expect to generate any data (18%), and privacy/data protection concerns (18%). Of those projects that were not originally part of the pilot, 11.9% (3268 projects) nonetheless have voluntarily opted in.

OpenAIRE supports the Pilot by providing a range of training and support materials, including information pagesfactsheetswebinarsbriefing papers and FAQs.

For further details, click here

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