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Canegrati, Emanuele

Last name
Canegrati
First name
Emanuele
Country
-
  • ESSAYS ON THE SINGLE-MINDEDNESS THEORY

    The scope of this work is analysing how economic policies chosen by governments are influenced by the power of social groups. The core idea is taken from the single-mindedness theory, which states that preferences of groups and their ability to focus on the consumption of goods enable them to obtain the most favourable policies. This approach exploits the advantages of probabilistic voting theory, ability to manage the multidiemnsionality and possibility to study precisely how politicians tai...

    In Search of Market Index Leaders: Evidence from Asian Markets

    This paper investigates the presence of Granger-causality amongst market indices in six Asian stock markets: Malaysia, India, China, Pakistan, the Philippine and Japan, from April 7th 1992 to July 23rd 2008. Using daily market returns I performed a Granger-causality test, based on the Vector Autoregressive (VAR) model, in order to detect the causalities amongst indices. Different sub-samples were considered, which take into account the distinction between bearish and bullish phases of the ...

    A Non-Random Walk down Canary Wharf

    In this paper I perform a panel data analysis to evaluate whether �- nancial technical indicators are able to predict stock market returns. By using a panel of 40 stocks taken from the Financial Times Stock Exchange (FTSE) observed in 2004, I test the ability of 75 amongst the most famous technical indicators used by traders to predict next-day returns. Surpris- ingly, results are robust in demonstrating that many of these are good predictors, supporting the validity of the technical analysis.

    A theory of the allocation of political time

    In this paper I will introduce a microfounded model of political ac- tivities. The aim is twofold: �rst of all, �lling an existing gap with the actual literature which still lacks of a theoretical explanation about how voters choose their leisure acitivities in particular those related with Politics; secondly, explaining why the old may have an interest to spend a greater amount of their leisure in political activities than the young. Empirical evidence taken by the British Election Suvery, c...

    The single-mindedness of labor unions when transfers are not Lump-Sum

    In this paper I analyse a labour market where the wage is endogenously determined according to an Efficient Bargaining process between a firm and a labour union whose members are partitioned into two social groups: the old and the young. Furthermore, I exploit the Single-Mindedness theory, which considers the existence of a density function which endogenously depends on leisure. I demonstrate that, when preferences of one group for leisure are higher than those of the other group the latter s...

    The Single-Mindedness of Labor Unions: Theory and Empirical Evidence

    In this paper I analyse a labour market where the wage is endogenously determined according to an Efficient Bargaining process between a firm and a labour union whose members are partitioned into two social groups: the old and the young. Furthermore, I exploit the Single-Mindedness theory, which considers the existence of a density function which endogenously depends on leisure. I demonstrate that, when preferences of one group for leisure are higher than those of the other group the latter s...

    Political Bad Reputation

    The goal of this paper is to explore how the connection between political ideology and voters’ preferences is able to generate different equilibria in a yardstick competition game, where good incumbents are forced to create a bad reputation or, in other words, to mimic the bad incumbents’ behavior in order to win the elections in a two-candidate political competition.

    Yardstick competition: a spatial voting model approach

    I analyse a yardstick competition game using a spatial voting model, where voters vote for a candidate according to the distance between their Ideal Point and the policy selected by a candidate. The policy which is closest to a voter’s IP provides the voter with a higher utility so that minimizing the distance means maximising the utility. I demonstrate that in the presence of asymmetrical information the existence of yardstick competition entails a selection device but not a discipline de...

    A formula for the optimal taxation in Probabilistic Voting Models characterized by Single Mindedness

    This work intends to specify a formula for the optimal taxation in Probabilistic Voting Models with Single Mindedness Theory. The goal is to find an equivalent expression to the Ramsey’s rule for a political economy environment where Governments are assumed to be Leviathans rather than benevolents.

    In Search of Market Index Leaders: Evidence from World Financial Markets

    This paper investigates the presence of Granger-causality amongst world market indices: S&P 500, Dow Jones Industrial Average, Eurostoxx 50, Nikkei, FTSE 100, from January 2nd 1987 to October 17th 2008. Using daily market returns I performed a Granger-causality test, based on the Vector Autoregressive (VAR) model, in order to detect the causalities amongst indices. Different sub-samples were considered, which take into account the distinction between bearish and bullish phases of the marke...
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