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Name
Orbit: Writing Around Pynchon
Type
Journal
Items
82 Publications
Compatibility
OpenAIRE Basic (DRIVER OA)
OAI-PMH
https://www.pynchon.net/jms/index.php/up/oai/

 

  • Gothic Traces in the Metaphysical Detective Story: The Female Sleuth in Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49 and Gibson’s Pattern Recognition

    This essay argues that William Gibson’s novel Pattern Recognition (the first volume of his Blue Ant Trilogy) borrows from Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49 as regards plot, character, narration, structure, imagery, and theme, even as it transforms these elements to reflect a post-9/11 world. The essay particularly focuses, however, on the fear and anxiety experienced by the protagonists, Pynchon’s Oedipa Maas and Gibson’s Cayce Pollard, who are among the very few female sleuths to appear in post...

    Listen to the Sound of the Quiet American: John Williams's Stoner

    Stoner (1965), John Williams’s third novel, questions and complicates mythologised versions of modern American identity and way of life. The story moves through two World Wars, the Great Depression following the Wall Street crash, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New-Deal America, a prolonged time of social upheaval throughout the world. The book re-imagines stuff-of-dreams versions of the American cultural hero modelled on the image of the brash, risk-taking and economically-successful ...

    Pynchon’s Creative Misuse of Entropy

    The article argues that David Letzler’s critique of Thomas Pynchon’s “Entropy,” while accurate in some respects, is misguided in its attempt to close down interpretations of the short story that focus on its use of entropy, both in the field of Information Theory and Thermodynamics. While acknowledging that Pynchon got things wrong, the article asks critics to explore how Pynchon tries to manipulate his lack of knowledge by situating what he thought he knew in contexts not normally associated...
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