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Name
Marvell Studies
Type
Journal
Items
11 Publications
Compatibility
OpenAIRE 3.0 (OA, funding)
OAI-PMH
http://marvell.openlibhums.org/jms/index.php/up/oai/

 

  • On a Crux in “Bill-Borrow”

    This article provides evidence that in Marvell’s Upon the Hill and Grove at Bill-Borrow, the lines “Upon its crest this Mountain grave / A Plum of aged Trees does wave” in the Miscellaneous Poems of 1681 should read “Plume of aged Trees,” as Marvell’s 1726 editor Thomas Cooke proposed, not “Plump of aged Trees,” as H. M. Margoliouth conjectured in his 1927 edition. The evidence relates to the meaning of the passage; “mechanical” and contextual considerations: Marvell’s use elsewhere of signif...

    Marvell’s Mower Poems as Alternative Literary History

    Students of English pastoral—Raymond Williams, Frank Kermode, Helen Cooper, Sukanta Chaudhuri—have long assumed that the mode withers after the death of Marvell. This is mistaken; in fact, it flourishes in Restoration and Georgian Britain as mock-pastoral. Marvell, followed by Rochester, Swift, John Gay, Mary Wortley Montagu, and others, grafts Greco-Roman pastoral’s ironic, satiric energies back onto soft, “arcadian” English pastoral, restoring the mode’s premodern balance of buffo/serio, pr...

    Andrew Marvell: Traveling Tutor

    It is well known that Marvell tutored the daughter of Thomas, Lord Fairfax, at Nun Appleton at the start of the 1650s. This article attempts to shed light on his less well-known stints of tutoring young gentlemen in the late 1640s and mid-1650s. It establishes the distinctive characteristics of the traveling tutor, responsible for the education and governance of a young gentleman on the tour. And it considers the opportunities for advancement, in both private and public service, presented by ...

    Transvernacular Poetry and Government: Andrew Marvell in Early Modern Europe

    Marvell’s experiences as traveling tutor, diplomat and political agent add a dimension of real international encounter in his poetry and prose that stands in addition to the literary citation or quotation of non-English books, and makes his verse distinctive among his contemporaries. This essay maps some of the literary landscape and the politics of literature in the places he visited in Europe, Russia and Scandinavia, and not least the monarchical absolutism experienced by some writers in th...

    Review of Hopper and Majors, New Perspectives on Thomas, 3rd Lord Fairfax

    A review of Andrew Hopper and Philip Major, eds., England’s Fortress: New Perspectives on Thomas, 3rd Lord Fairfax (Farnham, Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014), xv + 290 pp; 20 illus. $149.95.
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