Reward, Rest, and Antidepressant Drug Action

McCabe, Ciara (2013)
Translational Developmental Psychiatry
Video presentation of the entire lecture can be accessed here.Purpose of the study: Reduced subjective experience of reward (anhedonia) is a key symptom of major depression. We have developed a human model of reward processing to investigate the neural correlates of anhedonia.Methods: We report the data from studies that examined reward processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in those vulnerable to depression. We also report the effects of antidepressant medications on our neural model of reward processing and on the resting state in healthy volunteers.Results: Our results thus far indicate that deficits in reward processing are apparent in those vulnerable to depression, and also that antidepressant medication modulates reward processing and resting state functional connectivity in parts of the brain consistent with serotonin and catecholamine transmitter pathways in healthy volunteers.Conclusions: We conclude that this type of human model of reward processing might be useful in detecting biomarkers for depression and also in illuminating why antidepressant medications may not be very effective in treating anhedonia.(Published: 9 September 2013)Citation: Translational Developmental Psychiatry 2013, 1: 18652 - 

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