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Sheehan, Susan

Last name
Sheehan
First name
Susan
Country
-
  • What to test at C1?

    Introduction\ud This paper addresses the conference theme of constructs in assessment by seeking to identify criterial features at C1. It reports on a project which aimed to identify key criteria of written and spoken English at C1. The project hoped to bring clarity to our understanding of an under-specified and under-described level (Weir, 2005, Green, 2012). This new understanding could aid test developers when creating tests. The project was an extension of the British Council / EAQUALS C...

    Defining Criterial Approaches at C1: an approach

    This paper focuses on the question of where we are now with our understanding of the C1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The CEFR has had a dramatic impact on the fields of English language teaching and testing. The project which is the topic of this paper hoped to bring clarity to our understanding of an under-specified and under-described level (Green, 2012). This new understanding could aid test developers when creating tests. The project was based on the British...

    Exploring teachers’ language assessment literacy: a social constructivist approach to understanding effective practice

    Jones and Saville (2016) assert that the two key purposes of assessment are to promote learning and to measure and interpret what has been learned. In terms of classroom assessment, this implies that teachers have a central role to play in planning and/or implementing appropriate assessment procedures to monitor and evaluate student progress in their classrooms. But teachers’ attitudes and beliefs, based on their own experiences of assessment, exert a powerful role in shaping their decisions,...

    Assessment: attitudes, practices and needs.

    This presentation focuses on a project which investigated language assessment literacy practices in the English as a foreign language classroom. We sought to bring teachers more directly into the assessment literacy debate and provide them with training materials which meet their stated needs. Teachers’ attitudes and beliefs are frequently cited as exerting a powerful role in shaping their decisions, judgements and behaviour (see, for example, Borg, 2006). However, an investigation into what ...

    Assessment: attitudes, practices, needs

    This presentation focuses on a project which investigated language assessment literacy practices in the English as a foreign language classroom. We sought to bring teachers more directly into the assessment literacy debate and provide them with training materials which meet their stated needs. Teachers’ attitudes and beliefs are frequently cited as exerting a powerful role in shaping their decisions, judgements and behaviour (see, for example, Borg, 2006). However, an investigation into what ...

    Beyond surveys: An approach to understanding effective classroom assessment practices

    The aim of this project was to provide teachers with training materials that meet their actual, specified needs, based on interviews, classroom observations and focus-group discussions. Findings from the study reveal there are large differences in understanding between teachers and those who research and write about teachers’ language assessment literacy. We conclude by showing an example of materials produced, which were specifically requested by teachers to develop their understanding of th...

    What do teachers really want to know about assessment?

    This presentation will focus on a project which sought to bring teachers more directly into the assessment literacy debate and provide them with training materials which meet their stated needs. With the exception of a single case study following three Chinese University teachers (Xu, 2015), no teachers have been asked directly about their attitudes to assessment or their specific training needs.\ud \ud Following an earlier study which relied on survey data from teachers (Berry and O’Sullivan...

    Singing from the same hymn sheet? What language assessment literacy means to teachers

    This proposal focuses on a project which investigated language assessment literacy practices in the classroom. The project sought to bring teachers more directly into the assessment literacy debate and provide them with training materials which meet their stated needs. With the exception of a single case study following three Chinese University teachers (Xu 2015), no teachers have been asked directly about their attitudes to assessment or their specific training needs\ud \ud Exploring teacher...

    Exploring Teachers’ Language Assessment Literacy: A Social Constructivist Approach to Understanding Effective Practices

    Exploring teachers’ levels of assessment literacy in terms of their previous assessment experiences may help teacher educators to better understand the factors which promote or prevent effective assessment, thus contributing to more targeted and empowering teacher education. The research presented in this paper adopts a social constructivist model of learning and meaning-making, with the language classroom representing the community of practice. The first phase of the project consisted of int...

    Identifying key criteria of written and spoken English at C1: A qualitative study of key language points at C1

    This project set out to identify criterial features of written and spoken English at C1 by examining test\ud data to establish which of the language points included at C1 in the British Council – EAQUALS Core\ud Inventory for General English (the Core Inventory) were produced by the test-takers. The test data\ud were also examined to see if there were recurring language points which had not been included in the\ud Core Inventory.\ud The Core Inventory was created to provide a practical invent...
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