LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1

Using written language to probe speech recognition models

Title
Using written language to probe speech recognition models
Funding
ARC | Discovery Projects
Contract (GA) number
DP0453143
Start Date
2004/01/01
End Date
2006/12/31
Open Access mandate
no
Organizations
-
More information
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0453143

 

  • An Orthographic Effect in Phoneme Processing, and Its Limitations

    To examine whether lexically stored knowledge about spelling influences phoneme evaluation, we conducted three experiments with a low-level phonetic judgement task: phoneme goodness rating. In each experiment, listeners heard phonetic tokens varying along a continuum centred on /s/, occurring finally in isolated word or nonword tokens. An effect of spelling appeared in Experiment 1: Native English speakers’ goodness ratings for the best /s/ tokens were significantly higher in words spelled wi...

    Non-automaticity of use of orthographic knowledge in phoneme evaluation

    Two phoneme goodness rating experiments addressed the role of orthographic knowledge in the evaluation of speech sounds. Ratings for the best tokens of /s/ were higher in words spelled with S (e.g., bless) than in words where /s/ was spelled with C (e.g., voice). This difference did not appear for analogous nonwords for which every lexical neighbour had either S or C spelling (pless, floice). Models of phonemic processing incorporating obligatory influence of lexical information in phonemic p...
  • No project research data found
  • Scientific Results

    Chart is loading... It may take a bit of time. Please be patient and don't reload the page.

    PUBLICATIONS BY ACCESS MODE

    Chart is loading... It may take a bit of time. Please be patient and don't reload the page.

    Publications in Repositories

    Chart is loading... It may take a bit of time. Please be patient and don't reload the page.

Share - Bookmark

App Box