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Discovery Early Career Researcher Award - Grant ID: DE160100636

Title
Discovery Early Career Researcher Award - Grant ID: DE160100636
Funding
ARC | Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Contract (GA) number
DE160100636
Start Date
2016/01/01
End Date
2020/12/31
Open Access mandate
no
Organizations
-
More information
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE160100636

 

  • Using Aiptasia as a Model to Study Metabolic Interactions in Cnidarian-Symbiodinium Symbioses

    Rädecker, Nils; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Pernice, Mathieu; Perna, Gabriela; Guagliardo, Paul; Kilburn, Matt R.; Aranda, Manuel; Voolstra, Christian R. (2018)
    Projects: ARC | Discovery Early Career Researcher Award - Grant ID: DE160100636 (DE160100636)
    The symbiosis between cnidarian hosts and microalgae of the genus Symbiodinium provides the foundation of coral reefs in oligotrophic waters. Understanding the nutrient-exchange between these partners is key to identifying the fundamental mechanisms behind this symbiosis, yet has proven difficult given the endosymbiotic nature of this relationship. In this study, we investigated the respective contribution of host and symbiont to carbon and nitrogen assimilation in the coral model anemone Aip...

    The Life Aquatic at the Microscale

    ABSTRACT There are more than one million microbial cells in every drop of seawater, and their collective metabolisms not only recycle nutrients that can then be used by larger organisms but also catalyze key chemical transformations that maintain Earth’s habitability. Understanding how these microbes interact with each other and with multicellular hosts is critical to reliably quantify any functional aspect of their metabolisms and to predict their outcomes on larger scales. Following a large...

    Aiptasia as a model to study metabolic diversity and specificity in cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses

    Aranda, Manuel; Voolstra, Christian; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Pernice, Mathieu; Perna, Gabriela; Raedecker, Nils; Guagliardo, Paul; Killburn, Matt (2017)
    Projects: ARC | Discovery Early Career Researcher Award - Grant ID: DE160100636 (DE160100636)
    The symbiosis between cnidarian hosts and microalgae of the genus Symbiodinium provides the foundation of coral reefs in oligotrophic waters. Understanding the nutrient-exchange between these partners is key to identifying the fundamental mechanisms behind this symbiosis. However, deciphering the individual role of host and algal partners in the uptake and cycling of nutrients has proven difficult, given the endosymbiotic nature of this relationship. In this study, we highlight the advantages...

    A multi-trait systems approach reveals a response cascade to bleaching in corals

    Gardner, Stephanie G.; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Nitschke, Matthew R.; Nielsen, Daniel A.; Stat, Michael; Motti, Cherie A.; Ralph, Peter J.; Petrou, Katherina (2017)
    Projects: ARC | Discovery Early Career Researcher Award - Grant ID: DE160100636 (DE160100636)
    Background Climate change causes the breakdown of the symbiotic relationships between reef-building corals and their photosynthetic symbionts (genus Symbiodinium), with thermal anomalies in 2015–2016 triggering the most widespread mass coral bleaching on record and unprecedented mortality on the Great Barrier Reef. Targeted studies using specific coral stress indicators have highlighted the complexity of the physiological processes occurring during thermal stress, but have been unable to prov...

    Subcellular tracking reveals the location of dimethylsulfoniopropionate in microalgae and visualises its uptake by marine bacteria

    Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Clode, Peta L; Cheong, Soshan; Bougoure, Jeremy; Kilburn, Matt R; Reeder, Anthony; Forêt, Sylvain; Stat, Michael; Beltran, Victor; Thomas-Hall, Peter; Tapiolas, Dianne; Motti, Cherie M; Gong, Bill; Pernice, Mathieu; Marjo, Christopher E;... (2017)
    Projects: ARC | Discovery Early Career Researcher Award - Grant ID: DE160100636 (DE160100636)
    eLife digest Sulfur is an essential element for many organisms and environmental processes. Every year, organisms including microalgae produce more than one billion tons of a sulfur-containing compound called DMSP. Some of this DMSP is released into seawater, where it acts as a key nutrient for microscopic organisms and as a foraging cue to attract fish. DMSP is also the precursor of a gas that helps to form clouds. Despite DMSP’s potential large-scale effects, it is still not clear what role...
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