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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1

Protecting prey with chemical camouflage

Title
Protecting prey with chemical camouflage
Funding
ARC | Discovery Projects
Contract (GA) number
DP0881455
Start Date
2008/01/01
End Date
2010/12/31
Open Access mandate
no
Organizations
-
More information
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0881455

 

  • Predators are attracted to the olfactory signals of prey.

    Nelika K Hughes; Catherine J Price; Peter B Banks (2010)
    Projects: ARC | Protecting prey with chemical camouflage (DP0881455)
    Background Predator attraction to prey social signals can force prey to trade-off the social imperatives to communicate against the profound effect of predation on their future fitness. These tradeoffs underlie theories on the design and evolution of conspecific signalling systems and have received much attention in visual and acoustic signalling modes. Yet while most territorial mammals communicate using olfactory signals and olfactory hunting is widespread in predators, evidence for the att...

    Reproductive responses of birds to experimental food supplementation: a meta-analysis

    Ruffino, Lise; Salo, Pälvi; Koivisto, Elina; Banks, Peter B; Korpimäki, Erkki (2014)
    Projects: ARC | Protecting prey with chemical camouflage (DP0881455)
    Introduction Food availability is an important environmental cue for animals for deciding how much to invest in reproduction, and it ultimately affects population size. The importance of food limitation has been extensively studied in terrestrial vertebrate populations, especially in birds, by experimentally manipulating food supply. However, the factors explaining variation in reproductive decisions in response to food supplementation remain unclear. By performing meta-analyses, we aim to qu...

    Deadly intentions: naïve introduced foxes show rapid attraction to odour cues of an unfamiliar native prey

    Introduced predators have caused declines and extinctions of native species worldwide, seemingly able to find and hunt new, unfamiliar prey from the time of their introduction. Yet, just as native species are often naïve to introduced predators, in theory, introduced predators should initially be naïve in their response to novel native prey. Here we examine the response of free-living introduced red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) to their first encounter with the odour cues of a novel native prey, the...
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