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Ter Steeg, P. F.; Van Der Hoeven, J. S. (2011)
Publisher: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Journal: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: stomatognathic system, stomatognathic diseases, food and beverages
This study was undertaken to identify the ecological niches of members of subgingival microflora. The succession of species during enrichment batch growth of subgingival plaque organisms in serum was monitored. Three phases could be distinguished during growth, firstly carbohydrate consumption by rapidly growing saccharolytic bacteria such as Eubacterium saburreum or Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Streptococcus spp. leading to lactic and formic acid production. Secondly a later phase in which protein was hydrolysed, some amino acid fermentation took place, remaining carbohydrates were used and lactate and formate were consumed; growth was dominated by Bacteroides intermedius or Bacteroides oralis, Veillonella parvula, Eubacterium spp. and Fusobacterium nucleatum, and a final phase characterised by progressive protein degradation and extensive amino acid fermentation by the predominant species, Peptostreptococcus micros and Eubacterium brachy. Toxic products such as sulphide, ammonia, butyric acid and other fatty acids accumulated.Keywords: Peptostreptococcus micros; Eubacterium; Bacteroides; Fusobacterium nucleatum; Periodontitis; Serum degradation; Niche; Growth-curve.

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