LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Macfarlane, S.; Hopkins, M. J.; Macfarlane, G. T. (2011)
Publisher: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Journal: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
The large intestinal microbiota is characteristically viewed as being a homogeneous entity, yet the proximal colon and distal bowel differ markedly in relation to their nutritional availabilities and physicochemical attributes. Moreover, individual species and assemblages of microorganisms exist in a multiplicity of different microhabitats and metabolic niches in the large gut, on the mucosa and in the mucus layer, as well as in the gut lumen. Examination of intestinal material by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent light microscopy shows that most of the bacteria are not freely dispersed, but occur in clumps, and in aggregates attached to plant cell structures and other solids. With respect to the numerically predominant species, bacteria attached to surfaces in the gut lumen appear to be phylogenetically similar but physiologically distinct from non-adherent populations. These adherent organisms are more directly involved in the breakdown of complex insoluble polymers than unattached bacteria, which provides a competitive advantage in the ecosystem. In healthy people, mucosal populations are more difficult to study than faecal bacteria due to difficulty in gaining access to the bowel, and has restricted studies on these communities. Consequently, little information is available concerning the composition, metabolism and health-related significance of bacteria growing at or near the mucosal surface.Keywords: biofilms, mucosa, bacterial metabolism, mucus, pathogens.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article

Collected from