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Chiou, Lisa A.; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Horn, Andrea; Carter, Gary; Butler, Jay C. (2002)
Publisher: Co-Action Publishing
Journal: International Journal of Circumpolar Health
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: food and beverages, digestive, oral, and skin physiology, carbohydrates (lipids)
Objectives. Botulism cases due to traditional Alaska Native fermented foods occur periodically in Southwest Alaska. In this population, we conducted a survey on knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to botulism and fermented foods. Methods. We interviewed 140 adults randomly chosen from nine villages. Data collected included fermented food consumption frequency; knowledge about the cause and symptoms of botulism; and fermented food preparation methods. Results. Most respondents (81%) had eaten Alaska Native fermented foods at least once. Over 70% identified botulism as a foodborne illness, and over 87% believed eating certain Native fermented foods could cause botulism. One-third of fermented food preparers used plastic containers for fermentation. To prevent botulism, 45% would consider boiling fermented foods, and 65% would not eat foods fermented in plastic or glass containers Conclusions. Despite high awareness of botulism in this population, one-third of fermented food preparers use plastic containers, a practice which may increase the risk of botulism. Misconceptions and acceptable prevention messages about botulism, such as using traditional nonplastic fermentation methods, were identified and included in an educational video.(Int J Circumpolar Health 2002; 61:50-60)
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