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Kearney, Matthew; Schuck, Sandra; Burden, Kevin; Aubusson, Peter (2012)
Publisher: Research in Learning Technology
Journal: Research in Learning Technology
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: framework, Education, pedagogical features, pedagogy, L, mobile learning; pedagogy; socio-cultural theory; framework; pedagogical features, socio-cultural theory, mobile learning

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION
Mobile learning is a relatively new phenomenon and the theoretical basis is currently under development. The paper presents a pedagogical perspective of mobile learning which highlights three central features of mobile learning: authenticity, collaboration and personalisation, embedded in the unique timespace contexts of mobile learning. A pedagogical framework was developed and tested through activities in two mobile learning projects located in teacher education communities: Mobagogy, a project in which faculty staff in an Australian university developed understanding of mobile learning; and The Bird in the Hand Project, which explored the use of smartphones by student teachers and their mentors in the United Kingdom. The framework is used to critique the pedagogy in a selection of reported mobile learning scenarios, enabling an assessment of mobile activities and pedagogical approaches, and consideration of their contributions to learning from a socio-cultural perspective.Keywords: mobile learning; pedagogy; socio-cultural theory; framework; pedagogical features(Published: 3 February 2012)Citation: Research in Learning Technology 2012, 20: 14406 - DOI: 10.3402/rlt.v20i0/14406
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

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