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Ngatho S. Mugo; Kingsley E. Agho; Anthony B. Zwi; Michael J. Dibley (2016)
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Journal: Global Health Action
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: maternal health services, Original Article, skilled birth attendants; maternal health services; home birth; socio-economic factors; South Sudan, Public Health;Community Health; Population Health; maternal health, RA1-1270, Public aspects of medicine, home birth, South Sudan, skilled birth attendants, socio-economic factors
Background: In South Sudan, birth deliveries attended by unskilled birth attendants put the mothers and their newborns at increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with delivery by unskilled birth attendants or by unassisted delivery.Design: We examined data for 2,767 (weighted total) women aged 15–49 years who delivered at home 2 years prior to the South Sudan Household Health Survey 2010. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with delivery by unskilled birth attendants or by unassisted delivery.Results: The prevalence of delivery by unskilled birth attendants was 19% [95% confidence interval (CI) 17.0, 20.5], by skilled birth attendants (SBAs) was 45% (95% CI 42.4, 47.0), and by unassisted delivery was 36% (95% CI 34.2, 38.6). After adjusting for potential confounders, the following factors were associated with the increased odds for unassisted delivery or delivery by an unskilled birth attendant: mothers with no schooling, who did not attend antenatal care (ANC) during pregnancy, who had lower quality of ANC services, from poor households, or who had no prior knowledge about obstetric danger signs.Conclusions: We found that non-utilization of maternal health care services, such as ANC, was significantly associated with unattended birth delivery or delivery by unskilled health providers. The increased uptake of SBAs at delivery will require easier access to ANC services, health promotion on the importance and benefits of SBAs for delivery, targeting both mothers and their families, and the training and deployment of more SBAs across the country.Keywords: skilled birth attendants; maternal health services; home birth; socio-economic factors; South Sudan(Published: 28 July 2016)Citation: Glob Health Action 2016, 9: 29693 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/gha.v9.29693

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