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Dudarev, Alexey (2007)
Publisher: Co-Action Publishing
Journal: International Journal of Circumpolar Health
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: persistent toxic substances, reproductive health, aboriginal population, traditional food
Persistent toxic substances (PTS) have a tendency to bioaccumulate and biomagnify in food chains. Certain indigenous communities in the Russian Arctic are known to be at the highest risk of exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), organochlorine pesticides, some metals and radionuclides. This is the result of a number of factors including lipid-rich traditional food, cold climate and a special lifestyle. Exposure of humans to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been found to be associated with the occurrences of some adverse health effects. Due to their ability to pass the placenta barrier and be transferred from the mother to the newborn through breast milk, the possible effects of PTS during the critical stages of foetal development are of greatest significance. The project has been designed to evaluate the different ways of PTS migration to humans, particularly via local foods; to define the PTS content in the blood of indigenous populations of the Russian north; to determine dietary habits, life style and health status; to evaluate whether individual POPs and metals may be responsible for specific reproductive health effects, and whether radiation body burdens (over decades) could be associated with cancer mortality rates.Keywords: persistent toxic substances, reproductive health, aboriginal population, traditional food(International Journal of Circumpolar Health 66:2 2007

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