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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Vickie Aitken; Alex Lewis; Paul Booton (1997)
Publisher: Association for Learning Technology
Journal: Research in Learning Technology
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Education, L

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION
Recently, there have been major changes in the requirements of medical education which have set the scene for the revision of medical curricula (Towle, 1991; GMC, 1993). As part of the new curriculum at King's, the opportunity has been taken to integrate computer technology into the course through Computer-Assisted Learning (CAL), and to train graduates in core IT skills. Although the use of computers in the medical curriculum has up to now been limited, recent studies have shown encouraging steps forward (see Boelen, 1995). One area where there has been particular interest is the use of notebook computers to allow students increased access to IT facilities (Maulitz et al, 1996).DOI:10.1080/0968776970050207

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