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ZHANG, J.; LIU, S. M.; LÜ, X.; HUANG, W. W. (2011)
Publisher: Tellus B
Journal: Tellus B
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Based on an observation at the North Yellow Sea (Huanghai) over 2 years, this study describes main features (pH, EF Ca and flux etc.) associated with the wind-dust transport from East Asia (China) to the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Compositions of the atmospheric deposition are highly variable over the China Sea, with elevated dust flux (∼ 40 g m-2 yr-1) and poor rainfall in winter and spring in comparison to abundant rainfall and low dust flux (∼ 10 g m-2 yr-1) in summer and autumn. However, atmospheric dust fallout from winter and in spring differs in pH and EF Ca values. Examination of data refines that the wind-dust from Siberia/Mongolia and Northwest China has significant impact upon the chemical composition and flux of atmospheric fallout over the China Sea, although anthropogenic influences on the rain/snow chemistry have been identified. Annual wind-dust flux to the China Sea is estimated at 53.7 g m-2 yr-1, which is one order of magnitude higher than that over the Central North Pacific Ocean.DOI: 10.1034/j.1600-0889.1993.t01-3-00003.x
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