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Okerman, L.; Devriese, L. A. (2011)
Publisher: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Journal: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: parasitic diseases, bacterial infections and mycoses, bacteria, biochemical phenomena, metabolism, and nutrition, digestive system
Experimental infections with four different rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) biotypes were carried out in EPEC free rabbits, and intestinal colonisation was assessed by measuring semi-quantitatively the rectal colonisation. When the animals were infected for the first time shortly after weaning, the excretion followed an approximately identical course with all four EPEC: at 3-9 d post-infection all rabbits excreted the infecting EPEC strain in high quantities, and continued to do so for 1-2 wks. Rabbits that had survived such a colonisation with one EPEC, were protected against colonisation with strains belonging to other EPEC groups.Keywords: E. coli; Rabbit EPEC; Intestinal colonisation; Cross-protection.

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