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Klaasen, H. L. B. M.; Koopman, J. P.; Van Den Brink, M. E.; Van Wezel, H. P. N.; Scholten, P. M.; Beynen, A. C. (2011)
Publisher: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Journal: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Intestinal suspensions containing segmented filamentous bacteria (SFBs) were given orally to germ-free mice in an attempt to pave the way for the production of mice mono-associated with SFBs. The effects of dilution, sonication and chloroform/ethanol treatment of intestinal suspensions on SFB colonisation were investigated. Colonisation density of SFBs in the germ-free mice was dependent on the number of SFBs in the administered suspension. Sonication of suspensions had no effect. Chloroform/ethanol treatment of suspensions resulted in the production of di-associated mice, containing both SFBs and a non-characterised clostridium in their small intestine. It is suggested that, through specific elimination of the clostridium, these di-associated animals may be used to produce mice containing SFBs alone.Keywords: Colonisation; Intestinal bacteria; Mouse; Segmented filamentous bacteria.

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