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Krings, Thomas; Neininger, Bruno; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krautwurst, Sven; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.; Lindemann, Carsten; Ruhtz, Thomas; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Bovensmann, Heinrich (2016)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Reliable techniques to infer greenhouse gas emission rates from localised sources require accurate measurement and inversion approaches. In this study airborne remote sensing observations by the MAMAP instrument and airborne in-situ measurements are used to infer emission estimates of carbon dioxide released from a cluster of coal fired power plants. For the analysis of in-situ data, a mass balance approach is described and applied. Whereas for the remote sensing observations an inverse Gaussian plume model is used in addition to a mass balance technique. A comparison between methods shows that results for all methods agree within a few percent for cases where in-situ measurements were made for the complete vertical plume extent. Even though the power plants are partly in close proximity and the associated carbon dioxide plumes are overlapping it is possible to derive emission rates from remote sensing data for individual power plants that agree well with results derived from emission factors and energy production data for the time of the overflight.

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