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Beerten, Koen; Laloy, Eric; Vanacker, Veerle; Rogiers, Bart; Wouters, Laurent (2016)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
The rate at which low-lying sandy areas in temperate regions, such as the Campine area (NE Belgium), have been eroding during the Quaternary is a matter of debate. Current knowledge on the average pace of landscape evolution in the Campine area is largely based on geological inferences and modern analogies. We applied Bayesian inversion to an in-situ produced 10Be concentration depth profile in fluvial sand, sampled on top of the Campine Plateau, and inferred the average long-term erosion rate together with three other parameters, i.e., the surface exposure age, inherited 10Be concentration and sediment bulk density. The inferred erosion rate of 44 ± 9 mm/kyr (1σ) is relatively large in comparison with landforms that erode under comparable (palaeo-)climates elsewhere in the world. We evaluate this value in the light of the erodibility of the substrate and sudden base level lowering during the Middle Pleistocene. A denser sampling scheme of a two-nuclide concentration depth profile would allow to include more parameters in the model inversion and further reduce their uncertainty.
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