LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Minejima, C.; Kubo, M.; Tohjima, Y.; Yamagishi, H.; Koyama, Y.; Maksyutov, S.; Kita, K.; Mukai, H. (2012)
Publisher: Copernicus Publications
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Chemistry, QD1-999, Physics, QC1-999
Pollution events extracted from the in situ observations of atmospheric CO2 and O2 mixing ratios at Hateruma Island (HAT, 24° N, 124° E) during the period from October 2006 and December 2008 are examined. The air mass origins for the pollution events are categorized by using back trajectory analysis, and the oxidative ratios (OR = −O2:CO2 molar exchange ratio) for selected pollution events are calculated. We find that there is a significant difference in the average oxidative ratios between events from China (OR = 1.14 ± 0.12, n = 25) and Japan/Korea (OR = 1.37 ± 0.15, n = 16). These values are in a good agreement with the national average oxidative ratios for the emissions from fossil fuel burning and cement production (FFBC) in China (ORFFBC = 1.11 ± 0.03) and Korea/Japan (ORFFBC = 1.36 ± 0.02). Compared with the observation, simulations of the atmospheric O2 and CO2 mixing ratios using Lagrangian particle dispersion models do a good job in reconstructing the average oxidative ratio of the pollution events originating in China but tend to underestimate for events originating in Japan/Korea. A sensitivity test suggests that the simulated atmospheric oxidative ratios at HAT are especially sensitive to changes in Chinese fuel mix.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article