LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
A. Jahn; M. Claussen; A. Ganopolski; V. Brovkin (2005)
Publisher: Copernicus Publications
Journal: Climate of the Past Discussions
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: DOAJ:Earth and Environmental Sciences, [ SDU.ENVI ] Sciences of the Universe [physics]/Continental interfaces, environment, G, Geography. Anthropology. Recreation, Environmental protection, TD169-171.8, [ SDU.STU ] Sciences of the Universe [physics]/Earth Sciences, GE1-350, DOAJ:Environmental Sciences, Environmental pollution, TD172-193.5, Environmental sciences
ddc: ddc:550
The importance of the biogeophysical atmosphere-vegetation feedback in comparison with the radiative effect of lower atmospheric CO<sub>2</sub> concentrations and the presence of ice sheets at the last glacial maximum (LGM) is investigated with the climate system model CLIMBER-2. Equilibrium experiments reveal that most of the global cooling at the LGM (&minus;5.1&deg;C) relative to present-day conditions is caused by the introduction of ice sheets into the model (&minus;3.0&deg;C, 59%), followed by the effect of lower atmospheric CO<sub>2</sub> levels at the LGM (&minus;1.5&deg;C, 29%). The biogeophysical effects of changes in vegetation cover are found to cool the LGM climate by 0.6&deg;C (12%). They are most pronounced in the northern high latitudes, where the taiga-tundra feedback causes annually averaged temperature changes of up to &minus;2&deg;C, while the radiative effect of lower atmospheric CO<sub>2</sub> in this region only produces a cooling of 1.5&deg;C. Hence, in this region, the temperature changes caused by vegetation dynamics at the LGM exceed the cooling due to lower atmospheric CO<sub>2</sub> concentrations.