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Han, Jihyun; Lee, Meehye; Lee, Gangwoong; Emmons, Louisa K. (2017)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
We measured peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and other reactive species such as O3, NO2, CO, and SO2 with aerosols including PM10 and PM2.5 organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) at Gosan Climate Observatory in Korea (33.17° N, E126.10° E) during October 10 to November 6, 2010. PAN was determined through fast gas chromatography with luminol chemiluminescence detection at 425 nm every 2 min. The PAN mixing ratios ranged from 0.1 (detection limit) to 2.4 ppbv with a mean of 0.6 ppbv. For all measurements, PAN was unusually better correlated with PM10 (Pearson correlation coefficient, ? = 0.75) than with O3 (? = 0.67). In particular, the O3 level was highly elevated with SO2 at midnight, along with a typical midday peak when air was transported rapidly from the Beijing areas. The PAN enhancement was most noticeable during the occurrence of haze under stagnant conditions. In Chinese outflows slowly transported over the Yellow Sea, PAN gradually increased up to 2.4 ppbv at night, in excellent correlation with a concentration increase of PM2.5 OC and EC, PM1.0 K+, and PM10 mass. The high K+ and OC / EC ratio indicated that the air mass was impacted by biomass combustion. This study highlights PAN decoupling with O3 in Chinese outflows and suggests PAN as a potential indicator of overall aerosol formation in aged air masses impacted by biomass burning.
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