LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Kroes, Joop; Supit, Iwan; Mulder, Martin; Dam, Jos; Walsum, Paul (2016)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
This paper describes analyses of different soil water flow regimes on growth and yields of grass, maize and potato crops in the Dutch delta, with a focus on the role of capillary rise. Different flow regimes are characterised by differences in soil composition and structure are derived from a national soil database. Capillary rise and its influence on crop growth and resulting yields is simulated using Swap-Wofost with different boundary conditions. Case studies and model experiments are used to illustrate the impact of capillary rise. This impact is clearly present in situations where a groundwater level is present (85 % of NL) but also in other situations the impact of capillary rise on crop growth and production is considerable. When one compares situations with average groundwater levels with free drainage conditions without capillary rise yield-reductions of grassland, maize and potatoes are respectively 25, 4 and 15 % or respectively about 3.2, 0.5 and 1.6 ton dry Matter per ha. Neglecting capillary rise also has impact on the downward leaching water flux, the groundwater recharge. Impact can be considerable; for grassland and potatoes the reduction is 17 and 46 % or 64 and 34 mm. Modelling of soil water flow should consider capillary rise of soil water which will results in improved yield and downward leaching simulations.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article

Collected from