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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
A. Broschinski (1999)
Publisher: Copernicus Publications
Journal: Fossil Record
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Paleontology, QE701-760
Seit einigen Jahren werden die Funde großer Wirbeltiere aus der oberjurassischen Fossilfundstelle Tendaguru in Tansania durch diverse Mikrovertebraten ergänzt. Diese konnten durch gezieltes Schlämmen von Sedimentmaterial gewonnen werden (Heinrich, mündl. Mitt.), das während der Tendaguru-Expeditionen von 1908 bis 1913 gewonnen wurde.

Durch ein isoliertes Kieferfragment kann der Erstnachweis eines paramacellodiden Lacertiliers im Afrika südlich des Äquators (bei 10° südlicher Breite) geführt werden. Dieser Fund rundet das Bild der sehr weiten Verbreitung dieser erfolgreichen mesozoischen Echsengruppe ab.

Recently, there have been additional microvertebrate finds within the known macrovertebrate fauna of the Upper Jurassic locality Tendaguru in Tanzania. This resulted from the processing of sediment samples, which had been collected during the Tendaguru Expeditions in between 1908 and 1913 (Heinrich, pers. Comm.).

An isolated jaw fragment from a paramacellodid lizard is the first record of this family within the African continent below the equator (10° degrees Southern latitude). The occurence of this successful Mesozoic lizard group in Tendaguru reflects a greater global distribution than known to date.

doi:10.1002/mmng.1999.4860020111
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