LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Zellweger, C.; Forrer, J.; Hofer, P.; Nyeki, S.; Schwarzenbach, B.; Weingartner, E.; Ammann, M.; Baltensperger, U. (2003)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Results of continuous nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and total reactive nitrogen (NOy) measurements along with seasonal field campaigns of nitric acid (HNO3) and particulate nitrate (NO3-) measurements are presented for a two-year period at the high-alpine research station Jungfraujoch (JFJ), 3580 m asl. The NOy mixing ratio and partitioning is shown to strongly depend on meteorological conditions. Knowledge of these meteorological transport processes allows discrimination between undisturbed (i.e. clean) and disturbed (i.e. influenced by regional pollution sources) free tropospheric (FT) conditions at the JFJ. Median NOy concentrations during undisturbed FT periods ranged from 350 pptv (winter, December to February) to 581 pptv (spring, March to May). PAN was found to be the dominant NOy species during spring and summer, whereas NO2 was most abundant during autumn and winter. Particulate nitrate was found to contribute significantly to total NOy during thermally induced vertical transport. Föhn events, synoptical lifting (e.g. fronts) and thermally induced vertical transport resulted in mixing ratios up to 10 times higher at the JFJ compared to undisturbed FT conditions. Furthermore this meteorological variability of the NOy concentration and partitioning often dominated the seasonal variability. As a consequence the use of filters at the JFJ (and other mountainous sites) is crucial for the interpretation of data from such measurement sites. This study presents a further development of meteorological filters for the high-alpine site Jungfraujoch, which also could be modified and adapted to other mountainous measurement sites.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • Baltensperger, U., Ga¨ggeler, H. W., Jost, D. T., Lugauer, M., Schwikowski, M., Seibert, P., and Weingartner, E.: Aerosol climatology at the high-alpine site Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, J. Geophys. Res., 102, 19 707-19 715, 1997.
    • Baltensperger, U., Weingartner, E., Burtscher, H., and Keskinen, J.: Dynamic Mass and Surface Area Measurements, in: Measurement Technology, (Eds) Baron, P. A. and Willeke, K., John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2nd ed., 387-418, 2001.
    • Bauguitte, S.: in TACIA Final Report, EC R & D Programme Environment and Climate, 21-26, 1998.
    • Berkowitz, C. M., Fast, J. D., Springston, S. R., Larsen, R. J., Spicer, C. W., Doskey, P. V., Hubbe, J. M., and Plastridge, R.: Formation mechanisms and chemical characteristics of elevated photochemical layers over the northeast United States, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 10 631-10 647, 1998.
    • Blatter, A., Neftel, A., Dasgupta, P. K., and Simon, P. K.: A combined wet effluent denuder and mist chamber system for deposition measurements of NH3, NH+, HNO3 and NO3−, in: Physico4 chemical Behaviour of Atmospheric Pollutants, (Eds) Angeletti, G. and Restelli G., European Commission, Brussels, 767-772, 1994.
    • Bollinger, M. J., Sievers, R. E., Fahey, O. W., and Fehsenfeld, F. C.: Conversion of nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid, and n-propyl nitrate to nitric oxide by gold-catalyzed reduction with carbon monoxide, Anal. Chem., 55, 1980-1986, 1983.
    • Carpenter, L. J., Green, T., Mills, G., Penkett, S. A., Zanis, P., Schuepbach, E., Monks, P. S., and Zellweger, C.: Oxidised nitrogen and ozone production efficiencies in the springtime free troposphere of the Alps, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 14 547-14 559, 2000.
    • Carroll, M. A. and Thompson, A. M.: NOx in the non-urban troposphere, in: Progress and Problems in Atmospheric Chemistry, (Ed) Barker, J. R., World Sci., vol. 3, Singapore, 1995.
    • Crutzen, P. J.: The role of NO and NO2 in the chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere, Ann. Rev. Earth Planet Sci., 7, 443- 472, 1979.
    • Fahey, D. W., Eubank, C. S., Hu¨bler, G., and Fehsenfeld, F. C.: Evaluation of a catalytic reduction technique for the measurement of total reactive odd-nitrogen NOy in the atmosphere, J. Atmos. Chem., 3, 435-468, 1985.
    • Fahey, D. W., Hu¨bler, G., Parrish, D. D., Williams, E. J., Norton, R. B., Ridley, B. A., Singh, H. B., Liu, S. C., and Fehsenfeld, F. C.: Reactive nitrogen species in the troposphere: Measurements of NO, NO2, HNO3, particulate nitrate, PAN, O3 and total reactive odd nitrogen (NOy) at Niwot Ridge, Colorado, J. Geophys. Res., 92, 14 710-14 722, 1986.
    • Fay, B., Glaab, H., Jacobsen, I., and Schrodin, R.: Evaluation of eulerian and lagrangian atmosphere transport models at the Deutscher Wetterdienst using ANATEX surface tracer data, Atmos. Environ., 29, 2485-2497, 1995.
    • Fischer, H., Nikitas, C., Parchatka, U., Zenker, T., Harris, G. W., Matuska, P., Schmitt, R., Mihelcic, O., Muesgen, P., Paetz, H.- W., Schulz, M., and Volz-Thomas, A.: Trace gas measurements during the oxidizing capacity of the tropospheric atmosphere campaign 1993 at Izan˜a, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 13 505-13 518, 1998.
    • Forrer, J., Ru¨ttimann, R., Schneiter, D., Fischer, A., Buchmann, B., and Hofer, P.: Variability of trace gases at the high Alpine site Jungfraujoch caused by meteorological transport processes, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 12 241-12 251, 2000.
    • Fricke, W., Fischer, A., Forrer, J., Gilge, S., Hofer, P., Jeannet, P., Kaiser, A., Klennoff, K., Nemeth, R., Ries, L., and Winkler, P.: Filterung luftchemischer Messreihen im Alpenraum zur Charakterisierung ihrer Representanz, Berichte des Deutschen Wetterdienstes, No. 211, (in German), 2000.
    • Ga¨ggeler, H. W., Baltensperger, U., Emmenegger, M., Jost, D. T., Schmitt-Ott, A., Haller, P., and Hofmann, M.: The epiphaniometer, a new device for continuous aerosol monitoring, J. Aerosol Sci., 20, 557-564, 1989.
    • Hering, A. M., Staehelin, J., Baltensperger, U., Pre´voˆt, A. S. H., Kok, G. L., Schillawski, R. D., and Waldvogel, A.: Airborne measurements of atmospheric aerosol particles and trace gases during photosmog episodes over the Swiss Plateau and the southern pre-alpine region, Atmos. Environ., 32, 3381-3392, 1998.
    • Hoinka, K. P.: Synoptic-scale atmospheric features and fo¨hn, Contr. Atmos. Phys., 53, 485-507, 1980.
    • Jaegle´, L., Jacob, D. J., Wang, Y., Weinheimer, A. J., Ridley, B. A., Campos, T. L., Sachse, G. W., and Hagen, D. E.: Sources and chemistry of NOx in the upper troposphere over the United States, Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 1705-1708, 1998.
    • Lugauer, M., Baltensperger, U., Furger, M., Ga¨ggeler, H. W., Jost, D. T., Schwikowski, M., and Wanner, H.: Aerosol transport to the high alpine sites Jungfraujoch (3454 m asl) and Colle Gnifetti (4452 m asl), Tellus, 50B, 76-92, 1998.
    • Lugauer, M., Baltensperger, U., Furger, M., Ga¨ggeler, H. W., Jost, D. T., Nyeki, S., and Schwikowski, M.: Influences of vertical transport and scavenging on aerosol particle surface area and radon decay product concentrations at the Jungfraujoch (3454 m above sea level), J. Geophys. Res., 105, 19 869-19 879, 2000.
    • Nyeki, S., Baltensperger, U., Colbeck, I., Jost, D. T., Weingartner, E., and Ga¨ggeler, H. W.: The Jungfraujoch high-alpine research station (3454 m) as a background clean continental site for the measurement of aerosol parameters, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 6097-6107, 1998.
    • Nyeki, S., Kalberer, M., Colbeck, I., De Wekker, S., Furger, M., Ga¨ggeler, H. W., Kossmann, M., Lugauer, M., Steyn, D., Weingartner, E., Wirth, M., and Baltensperger, U.: Convective boundary layer evolution to 4 km asl over high-alpine terrain: Airborne lidar observations in the Alps, Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 689-692, 2000.
    • Parrish, D. D., Trainer, M., Buhr, M. P., Watkins, B. A., and Fehsenfeld, F. C.: Carbon monoxide concentrations and their relation to concentrations of total reactive oxidized nitrogen at two rural U.S. sites, J. Geophys. Res., 96, 9309-9320, 1991.
    • Pre´voˆt, A. S. H., Staehelin, J., Kok, G. L., Schillawski, R. D., Neininger, B., Staffelbach, T., Neftel, A., Wernli, H., and Dommen. J.: The Milan photooxidant plume, J. Geophys. Res., 102, 23 375-23 388, 1997.
    • Roberts, J. M.: Reactive odd-nitrogen (NOy) in the atmosphere, in: Composition, Chemistry and Climate of the Atmosphere, (Ed) Singh, H. B., Van Nostrand Reinhold, 176-215, 1995.
    • Rogak, S. N., Baltensperger, U., and Flagan, R. C.: Measurements of mass transfer to agglomerate aerosol, Aerosol Sci. Technol. 14, 447-458, 1991.
    • Schu¨epp, M.: Witterungsklimatologie der Schweiz, Band III, Beilage zu den Annalen 1978, (in German), 94 pp, Available from Swiss Meteorological Institute, 8044 Zu¨rich, Switzerland, 1979.
    • Simon, P. K. and Dasgupta, P. K.: Continuous automated measurement of gaseous nitrous and nitric acids and particulate nitrite and nitrate. Environ. Sci. Technol. 29, 1534-1541, 1995.
    • Stohl, A., Trainer, M., Ryerson, T. B., Holloway, J. S., and Parrish, D. D.: Export of NOy from the North American boundary layer during NARE 96 and NARE 97. J. Geophys. Res. 107, 10.1029/ 2001JD000519, 2002.
    • Thornberry, T., Carroll, M. A., Keeler, G. J., Sillman, S., Bertman, S. B., Pippin, M. R., Ostling, K., Grossenbacher, J. W., Shepson, P. B., Cooper, O. R., Moody, J. L., and Stockwell, W. R.: Observations of reactive oxidized nitrogen and speciation of NOy during the PROPHET summer 1998 intensive, J. Geophys. Res., 106, 24 359-24 386, 2001.
    • Wanner, H., Salvisberg, E., Rickli, R., and Schu¨epp, M.: 50 years of Alpine Weather Statistics (AWS), Meteorol. Zeitschrift, 7, 99- 111, 1998.
    • Weingartner, E., Nyeki, S., and Baltensperger, U.: Seasonal and diurnal variation of aerosol size distributions (10 < D < 750 nm) at a high-alpine site (Jungfraujoch 3580 m asl), J. Geophys. Res., 104, 26 809-26 820, 1999.
    • Zellweger, C., Ammann, M., Baltensperger, U., and Hofer, P.: NOy speciation with a combined wet effluent diffusion denuderaerosol collector coupled to ion chromatography, Atmos. Environ., 33, 1131-1140, 1999.
    • Zellweger, C., Ammann, M., Buchmann, B., Hofer, P., Lugauer, M., Ru¨ttimann, R., Streit, N., Weingartner, E., and Baltensperger, U.: Summertime NOy Speciation at the Jungfraujoch, 3580 m asl, Switzerland, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 6655-6667, 2000.
    • Ziereis, H., Schlager, H. , Schlute, P., van Velthoven, P. F. J., and Slemr, F.: Distribution of NO, NOx, and NOy in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere between 28◦ and 61◦N during POLINAT 2, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 3653-3664, 2000.
  • No related research data.
  • Discovered through pilot similarity algorithms. Send us your feedback.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article

Collected from