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Clinch, H.; Filimonau, Viachaslau (2017)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: human activities
ACM Ref: GeneralLiterature_MISCELLANEOUS
Existing research on risk management in adventure tourism has primarily focused on the participant’s motivation, perception and experience of taking part in the risky activities. Within this research strand, injuries and fatalities caused by participation in adventure tourism have been consistently examined and policy-making mechanisms discussed to prevent their future occurrence. This study adopts a different perspective as it explores how risk is perceived and managed by instructors. Better understanding of this topic should enhance future risk management strategies in adventure tourism, thus improving safety and well-being of both participants and instructors. The outcome of a qualitative study conducted with adventure tourism operators in Dorset, UK, shows that the increased popularity of the industry has caused companies to take advantage of profit margins. There is evidence that instructors cut corners when managing risks which raises the probability of accidents as a result. The study outlines a number of areas for policy-making intervention required to enhance the quality of risk management practices in adventure tourism. These include the need for policy reinforcement of the safety standards; specialist training opportunities made available to instructors and regular qualification re-assessment exercises.
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