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O'Brien, Kate
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects: BF636, RC0489, RC512, RC514
Dominant narratives about psychosis portray individuals as lonely, dangerous and unable to contribute to society. Such views may be incorporated into an individual’s personal story and are associated with negative outcomes for personal and clinical recovery. Art-making is associated with personal meaning-making and alternative forms of expression. It is therefore considered potentially relevant to narrative modification. \ud Adult service-users with psychosis participated in a gallery-based art-making intervention. At interview, participants used their self-created images to help tell their story. Literary, experience-centred and culturally-oriented lenses were used to analyse narratives. Turning-points as modifiers of stigmatised dominant narratives were explored, as was how the intervention supported recovery.\ud Art-making was associated with achievement, challenge and satisfaction. Story-telling using visual and verbal means opened up stories and alternative perspectives for participants. \ud Recovery-principles including hope and aspiration were supported, identified through goals and recognition of achievement. Sharing experiences with others with similar experiences was viewed as impacting positively on mental-health. \ud The intervention represented effective partnership working between NHS services and a gallery in overcoming barriers to accessing the arts, for people with psychosis.\ud Achievements in art-making and narrating experience using visual and verbal means offered alternatives to personally limiting and illness-dominated narratives.

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