LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
O'Loughlin, Thomas (2014)
Publisher: Peeters
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
This text - an important element in the Western Latin Eucharistic Prayer - has not been studied in detail since the 1950s (Jungmann); and has never been studied using the methods of modern textual studies. Yet it bristles with problems - textual variations in the early witnesses; theological in that the argument is self-contradictory; and linguistic: the Latin syntax is not only 'difficult' but downright wrong - which, if noted at all, tend to be ignored. This paper proposes that we see this text as the product of layers of accretion which each layer can be identified and the manner in which its addition distorted the overall text explained by the concerns of specific groups and periods. Having identified the layers, one can then see the original text which has elements that can be paralleled in second-century CE texts. When this Urtext is compared with the later 'textus receptus' it becomes clear that the focus of the text has been completely transformed - and in this transformation of its intent (both as a ritual object and as a text carrying doctrinal weight) lies the source of many later controversies - some of which are still being pursued with vigor today.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • John F. BALDOVIN, Boston, USA Introduction ......................................................................................... 1
    • Paul F. BRADSHAW, Notre Dame, USA What Do We Really Know about the Earliest Roman Liturgy?........ 7
    • Olof BRANDT, Rome, Italy The Archaeology of Roman Ecclesial Architecture and the Study of Early Christian Liturgy ....................................................................... 21
    • Juliette DAY, Oxford, UK and Helsinki, Finland Interpreting the Origins of the Roman Canon ................................... 53
    • Thomas O'LOUGHLIN, Nottingham, UK The Commemoratio pro vivis of the Roman Canon: A Textual Witness to the Evolution of Western Eucharistic Theologies? ........................ 69
    • Diane APOSTOLOS-CAPPADONA, Washington, D.C., USA '… decorated with luminous mosaics': Image and Liturgy in 5th/6th-Century Roman Church Apse Mosaics.................................... 93
    • Richard HILLIER, Surrey, UK Arator and Baptism in Sixth-Century Rome ...................................... 111
    • Thomas R. WHELAN, Dublin, Ireland Using God in War: Shifting Attitudes to War in 5th/6th-Century Roman Liturgical Sources................................................................................ 135
    • Robin M. JENSEN, Nashville, USA Saints' Relics and the Consecration of Church Buildings in Rome .. 153
    • Mark HUMPHRIES, Swansea, UK Liturgy and Laity in Late-Antique Rome: Problems, Sources, and Social Dynamics.................................................................................. 171
    • Markus VINZENT, London, UK Marcion's Roman Liturgical Traditions, Innovations and CounterRites: Fasting and Baptism ................................................................. 187 6 The nearest we have is Alfred Stuiber, 'Die Diptychon-Formel für die Nomina offerentium
    • im römischen Messkanon', Ephemerides Liturgicae 68 (1954), 127-46. It is worth noting that
    • 'On the early texts of the Roman Canon', JTS 4 (1903), 555-77 (reprinted in Liturgica Historica
    • [Oxford, 1918], 77-115). 7 J.A. Jungmann, Missarum Sollemnia (1955), II 159 (in the final German edition II 199-207,
    • Jungmann added no further details). 8 The patristic texts concerned can be conveniently found in Anton Hänggi and Irmgard Pahl,
    • Prex Eucharistica (Fribourg, 1968 [third enlarged ed., 1998]), 428-92. Note that Robert Cabié in
    • Aimé Georges Martimort (ed.), The Church at Prayer: The Eucharist (Collegeville, MN, 1992 [one-
    • volume ed.]), 80-1 makes this case for dating the prayer in its most explicit, yet concise, form. 9 See Gregory Dix, The Shape of the Liturgy (London, 1945), 498-502. 10 J.A. Jungmann, Missarum Sollemnia (1955), II 163. 11 For an example of the background rubricians' debate, see Nicholas Gihr, The Holy Sacrifice
    • of the Mass: Dogmatically, Liturgically and Ascetically Explained (London, 1942), 600 [the
    • original German edition dates from 1902]. 12 J.A. Jungmann, Missarum Sollemnia (1955), II 16319. 13 The German text reads der Vermerk which is better translated 'the marker'. 14 J.A. Jungmann, Missarum Sollemnia (1955), II 163. 50 See Angelus Häussling, Mönchskonvent und Eucharistiefeier: Eine Studie über die Messe
    • figkeit (Münster, Westfalen, 1973); see also Karl Rahner and Angelus Häussling, The Celebration
    • of the Eucharist (London, 1967) [original German ed., Freiburg, 1966] which examines the
    • development. 51 The proposed new translation recognises the biblical language of the first phrase and the
    • study text has added a footnote to Ps. 115:14, 18 and a pointer to Ps. 22:26; 50:14; 56:13; 61:9;
    • 65:2 [presumably a misprint for v. 1]; and 66:13; however, it does not note the biblical back-
    • ground for the second phrase. 52 Nah. 1:5; Job 22:27; Prov. 7:14; 1Esdr. 2:6; Jdt. 16:22; Ps. 22:26; 50:14; 56:12; 61:9;
    • 65:1 and 13; 115:14 and 18. 53 Ex. 36:3; Num. 15:3; 29:39; 30:6; Lev. 22:18 and 21; Deut. 12:6; Jonah 1:16; and Amos
    • 5:22. 54 See the very concise summary of the question by Michael D. Guinan in David Noel Freed-
    • man (ed.), Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible (Grand Rapids, MI, 2000), 1361, s.v. 'Vow.'
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article