LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Clark, S.D.; Watson, S.; Redfern, E.; Tight, M.R. (1993)
Publisher: Institute of Transport Studies, University of Leeds
Languages: English
Types: Book
Subjects:
This paper reports on the application of suitable techniques for detecting outliers and suggesting estimates for missing values in various forrns of traffic count data. The data used in this study came from three sources. The first set was provided by the Department of Transport's (DOT) regional office in Leeds and consists of automatic hourly traffic counts at four sites. The second set was part of a larger database provided by West Yorkshire Highways, Engineering and Technical Services (HETS). This set consists of automatic half hourly traffic counts on a single site. The third and final set was provided by Nottinghan University and consists of automatic five minute traffic counts at 40 locations, in close proximity to each other, from Leicester. \ud \ud Three suitable techniques emerged from pilot studies of such series conducted by Watson et a1 (1992a) and Redfern et a1 (1992). The three techniques are: a) Maintaining an average and variability measure over time; b) ARIMA modelling with detection of large residuals; C) A point's influence on the correlation structure of the series. A fourth technique, by-eye detection and estimation, provides an intuitive comparison for the first three techniques.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article