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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Buzzo, D. (2013)
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects:
Time has traditionally been measured in relation to physical phenomena witnessed in our environment. From the transit of heavenly bodies across prehistoric skies to the distance to walk from here to there or the arrival of birds on the wing from other continents. Observable, predictable physical phenomena have shaped our understanding of and standardisation of time. Since then the drive to measure in increasingly precise increments has led us to the fundamental building blocks of our physical world. Observing emissions of particles from the predictable decay of isotopes takes our traditional, anecdotal measurement of the physical nature of time to it’s ultimate root in the very fabric of matter.
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