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Hussain, Sofia N.
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects:
Exclusion rates for challenging pupil behaviour (CB) are increasing (DfE; SFR-28/2015). Where staff attribute CB to within-child or home-related factors, low perceived self-efficacy, negative attitudes and exclusionary practice amongst staff may increase (Jager & Denessen, 2015). Group problem-solving approaches including Circles of Adults (CoA) aim to facilitate staff attributions. Given their equivocal influence, such approaches require attunement and systematic research (Gulliford, 2015). Based on educational research (Gaudin & Chaliès, 2015), this study explored the impact of video-data within CoA via a mixed method, pre-post-test experimental, cluster randomisation design where staff reviewed video-data (experimental n=20) or, written-data (comparison n=19).\ud \ud Analysis of covariance statistical tests were performed on individual participant data (Attribution & Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires). Group theories (CoA transcripts) regarding behaviour were analysed via content and statistical analyses; allowing triangulation between qualitative and quantitative data. Participants’ views (Evaluation Questionnaire) were analysed using some statistical analysis and content analysis of narrative comments\ud \ud Findings from individual measures suggest that video-data encouraged staff to think holistically regarding causes of CB. Group data showed that video increased participants’ awareness of school factors whilst providing some insight into child-related factors. An unexpected relative increase in the experimental group’s home-related attributions suggests that CoA processes may have also impacted staff responses and aided holistic formulation, thus the impact of video may be mediated by the accompanying scaffolding and facilitation. Participants in both conditions, particularly in the experimental condition rated the overall CoA, and the added element of data as ‘helpful’. Narrative comments also tenuously suggest that video-data encouraged staff to consider school-factors to a relatively greater degree.\ud \ud Limitations include sample size for group data and reliability of measures. Findings implicate educational and psychological practice, school staff and potentially, pupils. Replication of this study on a larger scale and, use of deductive, qualitative methods will expound current findings.
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    • Coding Frames for Content Analysis of Group Theories (Steps 7 and 9) and, Narrative Comments of Evaluation Question 2 ............................................ 206 Ethical Approval from University of Nottingham Ethics Committee.............. 207 Debrief Letter for Participants ...................................................................... 208 Raw Data -Means per Participant for each Dependent Variable from the Attribution and SDQ measures .................................................................... 209 Normal Distribution Checks of the AttQ and SDQ Data - Research Questions 1 and 2......................................................................................................... 211 ANCOVA Assumption - (Scatterplot) Linearity Checks between Covariate and Dependent Variables for AttQ and SDQ Data.............................................. 212 Transcribed Group Theories with Assigned Codes...................................... 217 Normal Distribution Checks of the Evaluation Questionnaire....................... 225 Raw Data Means per Participant for each Quantifiable Dependent Variable from the Evaluation Questionnaire............................................................... 226 Narrative Comments from Evaluation Question 2 with Assigned Codes ..... 227
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