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Baker, Ruth; Tata, Laila J.; Kendrick, Denise; Burch, Tiffany; Kennedy, Mary; Orton, Elizabeth (2016)
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal: Burns
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Epidemiology, England, Thermal injuries, Children, Emergency Medicine, Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine, Article, Burns, Surgery
Objective:\ud To describe patterns in thermal injury incidence and hospitalisations by age, gender, calendar year and socioeconomic status among 0–4 year olds in England for the period 1998–2013.\ud \ud Participants:\ud 708,050 children with linked primary care and hospitalisation data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) and Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), respectively.\ud \ud Analysis:\ud Incidence rates of all thermal injuries (identified in CPRD and/or HES), hospitalised thermal injuries, and serious thermal injuries (hospitalised for ≥72 h). Adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), estimated using Poisson regression.\ud \ud Results:\ud Incidence rates of all thermal injuries, hospitalised thermal injuries, and serious thermal injuries were 59.5 per 10,000 person-years (95%CI 58.4–60.6), 11.3 (10.8–11.8) and 2.15 (1.95–2.37), respectively. Socioeconomic gradients, between the most and least deprived quintiles, were steepest for serious thermal injuries (IRR 3.17, 95%CI 2.53–3.96). Incidence of all thermal injuries (IRR 0.64, 95%CI 0.58–0.70) and serious thermal injuries (IRR 0.44, 95%CI 0.33–0.59) reduced between 1998/9 and 2012/13. Incidence rates of hospitalised thermal injuries did not significantly change over time.\ud \ud Conclusion:\ud Incidence of all thermal injuries and those hospitalised for ≥72 h reduced over time. Steep socioeconomic gradients support continued targeting of preventative interventions to those living in the most deprived areas.

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