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Baeza, JI; Boaz, A; Fraser, A; European Implementation Score (EIS) Collaborative Group, (2016)
Publisher: Elsevier
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: England, Specialisation, Evidence, Sweden, Poland, Abbott, health, Stroke care, Jurisdictions
Abstract: This paper investigates how the concepts of clinical specialisation and evidence influence the jurisdictional power of doctors, nurses and therapists involved in stroke care in Sweden, England and Poland. How stroke care has become a distinct specialism across Europe and the role that evidence has played in this development are critically analysed. Five qualitative case studies were undertaken across the three countries, consisting of 119 semi-structured interviews with a range of healthcare workers. The informants were purposively selected and their perspectives of evidence-based practice (EBP) within stroke care were explored. The data were analysed through thematic content analysis. The two key themes that emerged from the data were the health professionals' degrees of EBP and specialisation. The results illustrate how the two concepts of clinical specialisation and evidence are interrelated and work together to influence the different professions' degree of professional jurisdiction. It is concluded that doctors' professional dominance gives them full jurisdiction in stroke care and that nurses' and therapists' degrees of jurisdiction is dependent on their ability to specialise.
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