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A. E. Jones; E. W. Wolff; N. Brough; S. J.-B. Bauguitte; R. Weller; M. Yela; M. Navarro-Comas; H. A. Ochoa; N. Theys (2012)
Publisher: Copernicus Publications
Journal: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: Chemistry, DOAJ:Earth and Environmental Sciences, QD1-999, G, Geography. Anthropology. Recreation, QC801-809, Geophysics. Cosmic physics, sub-01, Physics, GE1-350, DOAJ:Environmental Sciences, Environmental sciences, QC1-999
To probe the spatial extent of tropospheric ozone depletion events during Antarctic spring, a network of 10 autonomous ozone monitors was established around the Dronning Maud Land sector of Antarctica for a full calendar year. Together with manned stations in the area, the network covered a ~1200 km stretch of coast, as well as a transect ~300 km inland and to ~2000 m above sea level (a.s.l.). Here we present results from the spring period (August to October 2008). While some ozone depletion events were evident at only a single site, implying localised ozone destruction, others were evident across the network. The fact that, on occasions, ozone depletion events were observed at all coastal sites simultaneously, suggests the depleted air mass had a scale of at least 1200 km. As the ozone-poor air was advected from the Weddell Sea sea ice zone, the data imply that large areas over the Weddell Sea sea ice zone are significantly depleted in ozone on occasions during Antarctic spring.