LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Lockley, Timothy James (2008)
Publisher: Routledge Journals, Taylor & Francis Ltd
Languages: English
Types: Other
Subjects: E151
For southern historians it sometimes seems as if our understanding of southern masculinity has not progressed much since the publication of Bertram Wyatt-Brown's Southern Honor: Ethics and Behaviour in the Old South twenty-five years ago. While those interested in lives of women have published numerous monographs and articles, outlining the particular stresses and strains to which enslaved women and their free counterparts were subjected to, the same cannot be said for men. Our stereotype of the upright southern man (nearly always elite whites), concerned with his honor and with expressing his mastery of his dependents, has remained largely intact. Friend and Glover's collection aims to challenge that monolithic view of southern masculinity and does so successfully.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article