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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Enticott, Gareth (2015)
Publisher: Springer
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: SF

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: animal diseases, food and beverages, bacterial infections and mycoses
This paper examines public attitudes to wildlife control to prevent the transmission of disease between wild and farmed animals. In Great Britain, there has been considerable controversy amongst farmers, the public, scientists and politicians over the role of badger culling in the management of bovine tuberculosis. This paper examines public attitudes to badger culling in rural Wales, the reasons why culling is rejected and/or accepted and the level of trust the public place in different organisations responsible for badger culling. Variations in public attitudes between areas of differing degrees of rurality and disease incidence are analysed. Results indicate moderate levels of support for badger culling, but respondents do not believe the current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of a cull is acceptable. Respondents in rural fringe areas and low disease incidence are more likely to favour badger vaccination. The results have implications for future policy and methods of communicating wildlife control policies to the public.
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