LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Waller, G. (2016)
Publisher: Wiley
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
This session will briefly review the evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) should be the first choice of treatment for adults with eating disorders (and a viable alternate choice for some younger cases). It will contrast that evidence with the fact that few clinicians use CBT for eating disorders, and that many who do use it do not use all the necessary elements, and will consider why that is so.\ud Thereafter, the session will outline three key elements that are necessary to make evidence-based CBT work in routine clinical practice – therapeutic stance, the principles of CBT, and the necessary techniques. It will stress the need to centre what we do on recovery goals, and to address the central ‘broken cognition’ in eating disorders.\ud The session will end with a moderated Q&A session, where attendees’ questions will be addressed.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article