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Fear, William J. (2009)
Publisher: The British Psychological Society
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: manop
Being out of work can have harmful effects on both physical and mental health, and nobody wants to hear that they are too ill to work. Yet the number of people on incapacity benefit (IB) has more than trebled since the 1970s to 2.7 million (DWP, 2002), without a corresponding decrease in the nation’s health.\ud \ud This wider focus is bringing together (among others) the once disparate and vague constructs, and sectors, of ‘stress’, ‘health and well-being at work’, ‘the happy and productive worker’, ‘sickness absence management’, ‘occupational health’, ‘return-to-work (RtW)’, and ‘welfare-to-work’. At the same time there is a growing recognition that the health-related elements of these sectors have been largely dominated by a clinical or medical model, and this has not proved effective.
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