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Hope, Douglas G.
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: Z011, Z807, 002_The_Book
A Hundred years ago, mountaineering was the preserve of the upper classes, Oxford and Cambridge graduates, diplomats and professionals. The working classes were more attracted to the seaside holiday resort, as expertly described in John Walton’s ‘The British Seaside: Holidays\ud and Resorts in the twentieth Century’ (MUP, 2000). However, from the middle of the nineteenth century, there was an explosion of interest in botanical societies (to study the area’s natural history) and rambling clubs, particularly in the industrial areas of Lancashire and Yorkshire. In the main, the members of these societies were self-educated manual workers, textile operatives and craftsmen.
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