LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Lacewing, Michael
Publisher: The John Hopkins University Press
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
As is widely known, the last twenty-five years have seen an acceleration in the development of theories of emotion. Perhaps less well-known is that the last three years have seen an extended defense of a predominant, although not universally accepted, framework for the understanding of emotion in philosophy and psychology. The central claim of this framework is that emotions are a form of evaluative response to their intentional objects, centrally involving cognition or something akin to cognition, in which the evaluation of the object relates to the concerns, interests, or well-being of the subject. I aim to summarize and review the work of five authors on three of the central themes of this framework, and to note some implications for the understanding of emotion in different psychotherapeutic approaches.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • Ben-Ze'ev, A. 2000. The Subtlety of Emotions. Cambridge, MA/London: MIT Press. 611 pp. ISBN 0-262-02463-2 (hbk).
    • Goldie, P. 2000. The Emotions. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 265 pp. ISBN 0-19-925304-8 (pbk).
    • Helm, B. 2001. Emotional Reason: Deliberation, Motivation, and the Nature of Value, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 261 pp. ISBN 0-521-80110-9 (hbk).
    • Nussbaum, M. 2001. Upheavals of Thought: The Intelligence of the Emotions, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 751 pp. ISBN 0-521-46202-9 (hbk).
    • Roberts, R. 2003. Emotions: An Essay in Aid of Moral Psychology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 357 pp. ISBN 0-521-52584-5 (pbk).
    • Bateman, A. and Holmes, J. 1995. Introduction to Psychoanalysis. London: Routledge.
    • Beck, A. T. 1976. Cognitive Therapy of the Emotional Disorders. New York: American Library.
    • Ben-Ze'ev, A. 2000. The Subtlety of Emotions. Cambridge, MA/London: MIT Press.
    • Ben-Ze'ev, A. 2004. Emotion as a Subtle Mental Mode. In Solomon, R. Thinking about Feeling: Contemporary Philosophers on Emotion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    • Blackburn, S. 1998. Ruling Passions. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    • Casement, P. 1994. On Learning from the Patient. London: Routledge.
    • Corradi Fiumara, G. 2001. The Mind's Affective Life. Hove: Brunner- Routledge.
    • Damasio, A. 1994. Descartes' Error. New York: Avon Books.
    • Ellis, A. 1962. Reason and Emotion in Psychotherapy. Secaucus, NJ: The Citadel Press.
    • Goldie, P. 2000. The Emotions. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    • Goldie, P. 2002. Emotions, Feelings, and Intentionality. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1: 235-254.
    • Griffiths, P. 1997. What Emotions Really Are. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    • Helm, B. 2001. Emotional Reason: Deliberation, Motivation, and the Nature of Value, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    • Hobson, R. 1985. Forms of Feeling. London: Tavistock.
    • Jackson, F. 1982. Epiphenomenal Qualia. The Philosophical Quarterly 32: 127-36.
    • McDowell, J. 1985. Values and Secondary Properties. In Honderich, T. (ed.) Morality and Objectivity. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul: 215-25.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article