LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects:
Proteins and other molecules interact with each other to form macromolecular complexes, which are the functional units inside the cell. Together, these make up the complexome. To date, there are 4 large-scale datasets for protein complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These were established by affinity purification and mass spectrometry. Of these, one featured protein sharing between complexes (Gavin et al.1). In this study, they proposed a ʻcore-module-attachmentʼ model. Core proteins are always present within a complex. Attachment proteins are single proteins that are sometimes but not always in a complex. Modules are groups of two or more strongly associated attachment proteins present in more than one complex. The aim of this study is to visualise the complexome as a network. This should provide a unique ʻhigh-levelʼ and biologically relevant view of the interactome.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article