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Publisher: Public Library of Science
Journal: PLoS Genetics
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Microbial Control, Microbial Pathogens, Research Article, Molecular Cell Biology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Microbial Evolution, Evolutionary Processes, QH426-470, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Genetics, Evolutionary Biology, Microbial Physiology, Biology and Life Sciences, Organismal Evolution, Developmental Biology, Microbial Growth and Development, Microbiology, Gene Function, Bacterial Pathogens, Speciation, Mutation, Medical Microbiology, Pathogenesis, Cell Biology, Medicine and Health Sciences, Gene Expression
Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade Gram-negative bacteria in a predatory process requiring Type IV pili (T4P) at a single invasive pole, and also glide on surfaces to locate prey. Ras-like G-protein MglA, working with MglB and RomR in the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, regulates adventurous gliding and T4P-mediated social motility at both M. xanthus cell poles. Our bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GTPase activating protein (GAP)-encoding gene mglB was lost in Bdellovibrio, but critical residues for MglA(Bd) GTP-binding are conserved. Deletion of mglA(Bd) abolished prey-invasion, but not gliding, and reduced T4P formation. MglA(Bd) interacted with a previously uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain protein Bd2492, which we show localises at the single invasive pole and is required for predation. Bd2492 and RomR also interacted with cyclic-di-GMP-binding receptor CdgA, required for rapid prey-invasion. Bd2492, RomR(Bd) and CdgA localize to the invasive pole and may facilitate MglA-docking. Bd2492 was encoded from an operon encoding a TamAB-like secretion system. The TamA protein and RomR were found, by gene deletion tests, to be essential for viability in both predatory and non-predatory modes. Control proteins, which regulate bipolar T4P-mediated social motility in swarming groups of deltaproteobacteria, have adapted in evolution to regulate the anti-social process of unipolar prey-invasion in the "lone-hunter" Bdellovibrio. Thus GTP-binding proteins and cyclic-di-GMP inputs combine at a regulatory hub, turning on prey-invasion and allowing invasion and killing of bacterial pathogens and consequent predatory growth of Bdellovibrio.

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