LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Publisher: Wiley
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: arthistory, comms_and_culture
The ideas of ‘corporate art’ or ‘corporate patronage’ became firmly embedded in the art world in the 1980s. However, this is not the only time that corporate sponsorship was suggested as having a role in the art world. In the 1940s, it was thought that big business could become the new “art angel” and assume the novel role of key patron of contemporary American artists. This article uses a case study—Pepsi Cola’s “Portrait of America”, an annual prize-bearing art competition with the twin aims of providing support for contemporary artists and acquiring materials for an advertising calendar—as a case study of why business patronage of art did not take root in the 1940s.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Download from

Cite this article