LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Publisher: Overseas Development Natural Resources Institute
Languages: English
Types: Other
Subjects: SB

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: stomatognathic system, stomatognathic diseases
Twenty trees of Pinus patula, growing on five sites in Zimbabwe as part of a progeny test, were examined and their pulping characteristics determined. The trees were from the same full-sib family and were 12 years old. No relationship between site, and wood density and fibre dimensions could be inferred because the differences between trees within a site were found to be greater than the differences between sites. All of the trees were pulped by the sulphate process: when constant digestion conditions with 18% active alkali were used, the yield of pulp from individual trees was from 41.3 to 44.9%. All of the pulps had a good tensile strength, but few had tearing strength sufficient for wrapping paper. Trees suitable for the production of pulps with high tearing strength were most likely to grow on the Grasslands site. For the twenty trees, there was a poor correlation between the rate of growth of a tree and the tearing strength of pulp produced from it; but within any one site the slowest growing tree was most likely to yield the pulp with the highest tearing strength.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article