LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Publisher: Elsevier
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMethodologies_DOCUMENTANDTEXTPROCESSING, ComputingMethodologies_IMAGEPROCESSINGANDCOMPUTERVISION
At retrieval, people can adopt a retrieval orientation by which they recreate the mental operations used at encoding. Monitoring by retrieval orientation leads to assessing all test items for qualities related to the encoding task, which enriches foils with some of the qualities already possessed by targets. We investigated the consequences of adopting a retrieval orientation under conditions of repeated monitoring of the same\ud foils. Participants first processed foils in the context of one of two tests encouraging different retrieval orientations. The foils were then re-used on a subsequent test in which retrieval orientation either matched or mismatched that adopted on the first test. In the aggregate data, false alarms for repeated foils were higher when there was a match between the retrieval orientations on both tests. This demonstrates that when\ud retrieval orientation enriches foils with target-like characteristics, it can backfire when repeated monitoring of the same foils is required.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article