OpenAIRE is about to release its new face with lots of new content and services.
During September, you may notice downtime in services, while some functionalities (e.g. user registration, login, validation, claiming) will be temporarily disabled.
We apologize for the inconvenience, please stay tuned!
For further information please contact helpdesk[at]openaire.eu

fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Gabriel, Gilbert
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects: PN1993
This thesis develops an approach to analyse how film soundtracks are used to signify characters’ subjective experiences of altered states that may distort or exceed their ordinary experience of reality through dreams, memories, intoxication, etc. Its aim is to contribute to critical audio-visual literacy by using Van Leeuwen’s sound semiotic theory (1999) in conjunction with film sound theory in order to investigate how characters’ subjective experiences of particular states of mind (dreams, memories and flashbacks, intoxication, terror and insanity) are signified in narrative fiction cinema by the soundtrack. Its central questions are:\ud 1. How are sound and music used to signify characters’ subjective experiences and what makes these uses of sound apt signifiers for signifying these states of mind?\ud 2. Is it possible to investigate this issue using a multidisciplinary approach that combines film theory and sound semiotics?\ud This study focuses on how characters’ subjective experiences of altered states are signified by eliminating either atmosphere or realistic sound effects or by the mixture of reality and unreality (e.g. intoxication where voiceovers and music are used to signify characters’ subjective experiences). It will explore how sound semiotics and film sound theory can be used to understand how soundtracks are used to signify filmic characters’ subjective experiences of altered states as well as investigating the most appropriate terminologies and transcription methods that may be used for this purpose. It will also discuss how film directors, such as Hitchcock, have created innovative solutions for conveying subjective modality in cinema.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article

Cookies make it easier for us to provide you with our services. With the usage of our services you permit us to use cookies.
More information Ok