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Publisher: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
The study aimed to conduct a content analysis of the different types of public health data maintained by the Health Department, the Department of Women and Child Development, and the private for profit and not for profit health sectors and the links that exist between them in terms of data sharing. \ud Method: In two districts, Sitapur and Unnao, an IDEAS/PHFI study team visited district, sub-district and village level health facilities (public and private) as well as NRHM programme management units, and Women and Child Development offices. The team collected all available forms and interviewed facility staff and programme managers to understand the types of data collected, their flow and data sharing. Case studies of three \ud not-for-profit non-governmental organisations were developed to understand how they maintain and share data with the public health system. \ud Findings: The public health system collects a large volume of health data; Data exist for all of WHO’s health system building blocks, but it is unevenly distributed. There are fewer data on contextual information, e.g. village infrastructure and demographic profile, compared to service delivery; There is little formal or institutional routine data sharing between the public and private health sectors, and between the health department and other related departments such as Women and Child Development.\ud
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